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The DIY Generation

Consider this Part 2 of my In Defense of Millennials series.

Kids these days are so goddamn lazy and ignorant. They don’t even know how to change a tire. They can’t read a fucking map without their damn smartphones. They can’t balance a check book, and they always call handymen for basic home repairs. They’re useless, the whole lot of them!

Kidsthesedays

Not!

Recent articles like this, have been circulating around the internet about the lack of useful skills younger people have in comparison to their elders. Perhaps they’re right about the fact that our generation is different from the rest. That isn’t false. Perhaps we have benefited from technologies in ways that we have neglected to, or haven’t had the need to learn how to do things like read maps (thanks to Google Maps and GPS), or balance checkbooks. (We have Banking Apps, and Budgeting Apps like Mint.com)

The DIY Generation

But the very thing which has led to our ignorance in many areas, may also lead to us later becoming as informed, if not more informed than previous generations.

The internet has more information that you can ever use and acquire in a lifetime. It is the world’s archive for basically everything. Practically every book, movie, video game of any genre can be found on it. With a great array of available knowledge, comes great potential.

Although older people complain about the lacking skills of their children and grandchildren, all is not lost. The very thing that makes the internet a distraction machine and a crutch for not having to actually posses certain skills is the same thing that will ultimately teach Millennials these very skills.

DIY Banner

Millennials are a generation that has grown up with the web for most of their lives. Many of them are very comfortable with using the internet for things like social media, learning a language, Words with Friends, and believe it or not, even using it to solve a problem. As a long time tech nut, I know that I’ve used the internet to teach myself practically all I know about fixing computers. The internet is chalk full of how to guides to properly build a computer, which came in handy when I built my on PC for the first time with my nephew last year.

There are all sorts of resources on the internet on how learn skills and how certain things work. Resources like the Khan Academy are leading the way in revolutionizing how people learn. People can watch bite-sized to long videos to learn about anything from applied mathematics to videos about civics and how the electoral college functions.

Khan Academy

People can use the thousands upon thousands of Youtube videos to learn how to make home repairs, change brake pads in a car, bake bread, learn a musical instrument, tile a room, and plenty of other things. The internet is paradise for an autodidact, and as Millennials crawl out of their student loan debt and decide to marry and settle down, they will find themselves in need of learning a lot of useful and practical skills. But most of them sure as hell won’t call others to fix their things when they can just learn how to fix things over the internet.

smartphone addiction

Smartphones may seem like crack now to many, but it won’t be that way forever.

Staring at iPhone screens and calling people for every little thing one moment, to being self starters, and fixing things themselves with the encyclopedic knowledge of the web. Don’t count the kids out just yet.

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One comment on “The DIY Generation

  1. […] 10. The DIY Generation: “Recent articles like this, have been circulating around the internet about the lack of useful skills younger people have in comparison to their elders. Perhaps they’re right about the fact that our generation is different from the rest. That isn’t false. Perhaps we have benefited from technologies in ways that we have neglected to, or haven’t had the need to learn how to do things like read maps (thanks to Google Maps and GPS), or balance checkbooks. (We have Banking Apps, and Budgeting Apps like Mint.com)” […]

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